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Posted by David Wolfe on Saturday, November 4, 2017

Often times, life can get busy. It can feel like our time is consumed by our schedules set by some force beyond our control. We become consumed with life and not the parts we’d prefer like work, chores, and other obligations. In those times, we might feel overwhelmed and say to ourselves, “If only I had more time” or “I wish I weren’t so busy”.

But the truth is, being “Too Busy” is a myth. We make time for people we want to make time for. We make times for things we want to make time for. We’re only too busy for those we don’t or for things we don’t want to do or really care for.

“Being too busy is a myth. People make times for the things that are really important to them.”

This isn’t to say that people or things we don’t make time for are not important to us. At any given point in time, we can be physically, mentally, emotionally, or spiritually exhausted. The sad reality is that life can be draining. During those times, it can be difficult to have the energy “care”. Still, though, we all have to admit that in those times we evaluate how much effort would be involved in making time for a person or task and compare that to their importance to us. Would I rather speak with this person or hangout with them, or would I rather stay home and relax? Do I really want to do this activity, or is it more important to me to do something else? Am I honestly too busy at the moment, or do I just need alone time? Or am I using the claim of being “too busy” because I just honestly don’t care and looking for a way out?

Am I constantly “too busy” for this person or activity, or do I honestly not care for their company or friendship as much as I claim to or think?

I admit that I’ve been guilty of brushing people or things aside when I’m physically, mentally, or spiritually exhausted. Alone time is a necessity for healing. There is nothing wrong with wanting some time for ourselves and we should always respect that need. But what about those times when I’m not busy nor tired. Do I find myself still claiming to be too busy for that person or task? If a friend comes to town, do I find myself debating whether or not I want to take the time out of my schedule to see them or make a real effort to accommodate some time to spend with them? If I do, do I do it with gusto or do I view it as a chore and an obligation? Ultimately, do I view this person as an important relationship I care about or an association I can do without? A few other examples: If someones passes, do I make an effort to go to the funeral? If someones marries, do I go to the wedding out of desire or obligation? If someone asks me to help them move, do I do it gladly or do I make an excuse not to? The moving question is a good one. It’s said you know who your real friends are if they help move.

What are my real priorities in these situations? On Facebook, many people seems to have hundreds, even thousands, of “friends”. Yet, it’s certain that the vast majority of those “friends” do not view themselves as such, but more as mere acquaintances if even that.

If you find yourself constantly “too busy” for that person or activity, then you may have the answer already. And on a more sobering thought, as much as we think otherwise, people notice when we’re always too busy for them.

Remember, we always make time for the people and things we care about.  What or who do you care about? And who or what can you do without? Me personally, I try to put in as much effort as a person puts into me. If you care, I care. If you don’t, I don’t. Whether this is good or bad, I don’t know, but it saves a lot of heartache and headaches.